opus vancouver

Showing 59 posts tagged opus vancouver

Let’s Elope

Running away with a lover is the epitome of romance. It’s wildly spontaneous, beautifully intimate, scandalously private, and succulently exhilarating. An elopement is a delicious secret held captive until after the “I do’s” have been declared and a pair of rings wrap fingers. It’s a monumental affair whispered to only a fortunate few.

We’re excited to be one of those privy to your celebration of love with the new Steal My Heart Elopement Package at OPUS Hotel. We’ll greet you with sparkly champagne and soft macarons in your stunning Signature Suite, drive you to dinner in our Jaguar, and leave you on your wedding eve to enjoy a jetted bath, movie, popcorn, and the divine four-post bed.

On your wedding day, have your mind and muscles relaxed with an in-suite couples massage. We’ll take care of ceremony details. Pick your preferred time to profess your love and we’ll provide flowers, champagne, a marriage commissioner, and witnesses… all in the comfort of your suite. Celebrate over a 4-course dinner - either behind your closed door or downstairs in La Pentola - before you make use of that four-poster again.

For those without a care for exorbitant centrepieces, political table charts, and competitive bouquet tosses. No worries. No stresses. No in-laws. Just you and your beloved.

Find more details of the Steal My Heart Elopement Package here.

~ Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

IMAGES (left to right): Read Between the Lines, Pinterest - original source unknown, Pinterest - original source unknown.

OPUS Vancouver + Music Direction present…

After the hit of Music Direction’s summer playlist, we’ve enlisted their music knack to ease in autumn’s chill. Press play before you throw up leaves, dance in front of a fire, and pop a bottle of red.

OPUS Hotel ~ Autumn ~ from Music Direction on 8tracks Radio.

Tap the Phone - Francis and the Lights

Don’t Call it Love - Zero 7

Give You Up (feat.KLP) - Le Crayon

Adalita (feat. Chela) - Goldroom

Coffee (Cousin Cole & Nacey Edit) - Misun

A World Alone - Lorde

Speed of Dark - Emiliana Torrini

Feelings - The Ballet

~Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

Street Notoriety

Banksy’s speciality is creating a stir – not only with his meaningful graffiti art but with his much criticized opinion piece on the World Trade Center that got denied by the New York Times. Few know who the mysterious artist truly is, but his anonymity only adds to the appeal. It’s when the mask comes off and all is revealed when we may lose interest, proving, once again, that mystery holds attention.

Here’s a few reasons why we still love Banksy:

1. He’s influenced by the stars and sprays his art in the quiet of night.

2. He takes risks with his creativity, providing art that evokes thought and debate.

3. Under anonymity, he set up a stand in Central Park and sold his pieces for $60 each - works of art that usually sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

4. Commercialization and money aren’t his bag. He just wants to tell his message through art.

5. After learning that a homeless man was living in a water tank he had covered with graffiti, Banksy gave him enough money to get an apartment and support himself for a year.

6. He does what he loves. The ultimate rule to life.

Now, will Banksy ever be lured to Vancouver?

~ Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

A Haunted Halloween

Halloween seems to have lost its eerie nature amongst the superhero, fairy, and cowboy costumes that roam the streets for one night every October. But rather than dress up as your favourite character or fantasy, wouldn’t you rather infuse some scare into your night of ghouling?

Get in the spirit with chilling movies, such as American Mary (by the Vancouver-based Soska twins), The Exorcist, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Ringu (the Japanese film that inspired The Ring), or Mama. Find an Ouija board to conjure up the dead. And while Ryan Gosling’s not all that scary, his band, Dead Man’s Bones, will leave you haunted.

~Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

And the beat goes on

The Beat Generation began in the late 1940s as a group of friends who refused to conform. They were a table of writers - Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady and William S. Burroughs - who had grand ideas about sexuality, drugs, materialism, individualism, and life in general.

It was about being a free spirit, living a life rich with experience, seeking adventure, and embracing the different. And they wrote as though their words sang jazz.

Try some beat slang in OPUS Bar this month:

Dixie fried = drunk

Claws sharp = all knowing about everything

Quail hunting = picking up ladies

Jungled up = your living arrangements

A shape in a drape = a well-dressed person

Making the scene = in the right place at the right time

Back seat bingo = car makeouts

Last week, Kill Your Darlings, a film about Allen Ginsberg’s role in the generation as a beat poet, was released into theatres. Starring Daniel Radcliffe as Ginsberg, Dane DeHaan as Lucien Carr, Jack Huston as Jack Kerouac, and Ben Foster as William Burroughs, the film articulates how a young man turns into a literary figure.

“Follow your inner moonlight; don’t hide the madness.” ~ Allen Ginsberg

WATCH THE TRAILER

~Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

OPUS Profile : John deC. Evans

We’re taking you further inside our hotel to introduce you to a few of the people who have made it a reality. I sat down with John deC. Evans, visionary, developer, co-owner and president of OPUS Hotels Corporation, to talk about his vision, favourite rooms, and his perfect day in Vancouver.

Tell us about the OPUS revamp.

In the life of a hotel, there is always the requirement for a makeover. The vision needed to evolve like people, fashion, and music. They all change with time. The energy and spirit of the original vision had been well received globally. We always wanted a residential look and feel, which was expressed in light fixtures, fabric selections and colour choices. We worked collaboratively with Robert Bailey, the interior designer, to continue that approach in the revamp. The goal was to stay true to character – neither more conservative nor more outlandish.

What’s your favourite room and muse?

From a colour perspective, I’ve always liked the muse Mike. I liked the vibrancy of the original, bold red. With the revamp, the colour has softened and brightened but is still a favourite. We retired the golden colour and, hence, the muse couple called Bob and Carol. Frankly, they were dated. They left with their harvest gold colour, which was kind of done. And in came an Hermés orange with our Pierre muse. Love it. If I had to pick, I’d say I like those, Mike and Pierre.

The vision in the rooms and suites was that they would have all of the essential pieces – even in the smallest rooms. There would be the same excitement for guests staying in the standard room as in any other. I’ve stayed in that room. I like that room - the feeling, quality, coziness - as much as the signature penthouse suite.

With each visit, you might be in a different state of mind. If you’re in an introspective mood, you would perhaps choose to stay in Susan’s blue room because it makes you feel restful. Or if you want to have a party weekend – try some things you’ve never tried before – you may stay in Billy’s green room.

Once a guest has stayed with us, they’ll know our muses and colours, and will know upon returning which room to select for their mood. The nice thing about that is a guest will never have the same experience twice.

As a traveler, how would you spend a day in Vancouver?

Get to bed early, get up early. Wake up refreshed when the sun rises (or to sheets of rain). You have the choice to exercise first or go to breakfast. The day is very much about being outside and being active, absorbing the beauty of the city rain or shine. Spend the afternoon at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

There’s amazing dining in the city, including lots of chef owned and operated restaurants, such as Lucais Syme’s La Pentola and Pino Posteraro’s Cioppino’s - both brilliant dining experiences. And there’s a little sushi restaurant on Pacific Boulevard called Ki-Isu – it’s great and always packed.

What are your favourite dishes on the menu at La Pentola?

The soufflé di parmigiano with zucchini crudo and the lemon cream dessert. They have similar textures and they both melt in your mouth. If I never ate another thing, I would be happy.

~ Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

Telling tales in Vancouver

We see a lot of stories coming through OPUS Hotel. Everybody who stays here has a story. Some of them even tell stories for a living. There is so much we can learn from another’s experiences. But if you’re not one to ask a stranger to tell their tale, find yourself at one of these Vancouver storytelling events:

PechaKucha: 20 slides at 20 seconds each add up to six minutes and forty seconds per speaker at this series that is held in 447 cities around the world. Presenters have included Danielle La Porte, Mark Brand, Devon Brooks, and OPUS’ own John Evans.

Creative Mornings: Once a month, in the early hours of a Friday, a small group gather to listen to one person’s idea of creativity. The room is small enough to encourage questions and interaction, while inspiration bounces off the walls.

Rain City Chronicles: This evening of music and talking allows anyone to get on stage to tell their story. From the guy who pours your beer to the voice you hear on the radio. This night is about bringing a community together.

Monday Night Live: On a regular basis, East of Main Café, a huge supporter of Project Limelight, opens its doors for storytelling. Actors, directors, writers, and other members of Vancouver’s film community are given seven minutes to tell a true tale on a provided topic.

~ Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

Spellbound by sentence

She is one of Canada’s most treasured gems. Literary empress, Margaret Atwood has been wooing the world with words since The Handmaid’s Tale was awarded several times over and recognized globally as a notable science fiction novel in 1985.

Her storytelling is daring. It provokes lumps to form in throats and tongues to lick lips. She caresses words, cajoling them into bold statements and poetic sentences.

Here are a few quotes that seem to make time stop in its tracks…

“I would like to be the air that inhabits you for a moment only. I would like to be that unnoticed and that necessary.”

“Romance takes place in the middle distance. Romance is looking in at yourself through a window clouded with dew. Romance means leaving things out: where life grunts and shuffles, romance only sighs.”

“Touch comes before sight, before speech. It is the first language and the last, and it always tells the truth.”

“The best way of keeping a secret is to pretend there isn’t one.”

“Water does not resist. Water flows. When you plunge your hand into it, all you feel is a caress. Water is not a solid wall, it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it. Water is patient. Dripping water wears away a stone. Remember that, my child. Remember you are half water. If you can’t go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does.”

“You can think clearly only with your clothes on.”

Atwood’s latest book, MaddAddam, was released this year.

~Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

OPUS Bar’s Fall Cocktails

I can already see my breath. Summer has officially departed. And the crispness that has arrived can only be combated with something that warms you from the inside.

OPUS Bar has revealed its fall offerings. A list of fluids that act as a furnace when consumed.

On one of these early autumn evenings, I was treated to a taste from bartender Martin Corriveau, who shook and stirred a Val Venosta and Castelletto for me.

With one sip of the green Val Venosta I found myself in an orchard of apples. The martini (42 Below Vodka, Apple Brandy, Lime Juice, Basil, Apple Juice) is equally balanced with flavours – the basil and apple complement and caress each other like lovers spooning. I wanted to savour each sip. Tasting the elements individually.

Once this mixture had disappeared, I moved on to the Castelletto, named after the red light district in Venice in the 14th century. The crimson potion (Martini Rosso, Grappa, Smoked Plum Syrup, Acid Phosphate, Absinthe) bites like the inhabitants of its namesake – sweetly, with affection and arousal. I wanted more.

Come into OPUS Bar for one of these new concoctions. Visit on one of the following dates to accompany your cocktail with music.

Friday, October 11, 7 – 10pm – Colin Bullock
Saturday, October 12, 7 – 10pm – Luca Fogale
Friday, October 18, 7 – 10pm – Martin Acosta
Friday, October 25, 7 – 10pm – Greg Neufeld
Saturday, October 2, 7 – 10pm – Ali Milner

~ Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider

Ziggy Lives

Have you caught it yet? The fever. It’s infectious. With one note, one glimpse, one listen.

David Bowie fever first broke four decades ago and it’s still spreading and affecting people around the world. His music has stayed relevant throughout the disco, rock, pop, and electronic eras, and this year he released his first new album in 10 years proving his music can still go viral.

But it’s not just the music that draws people in, it’s him. His energy, sexuality, fashion, intelligence, eccentricities arouse and magnetize. Nobody is safe. All are susceptible.

This is why we love David Bowie…

1. His painted face in Labyrinth was more desired than Jennifer Connelly’s makeup amongst women of the 80s everywhere. And despite his creepy character, the sex appeal oozes out of him.

WATCH

2. Bowie’s Space Oddity number made it outside earth when Chris Hatfield covered it from the International Space Station. Ziggy Stardust would be proud.

WATCH

3. He reads. Volumes and volumes of books. Start checking off page turners from his top 100 list.

READ

4. Bowie’s the subject of an exhibit that originated in London’s Victoria and Albert museum and has now made its way to Toronto’s AGO. His costumes, art work, instruments, and music are all on display for hungry fans. 

GO

5. He’s a trained mime and he turned down a knighthood from the Queen. Need we say more?

~Sandra O’Connell, OPUS Insider